Line 6B Assessment, Restoration, and Monitoring

GEI implemented ecological restoration measures throughout the impacted area, recognizing strict regulatory constraints, and restored river banks, floodplains, and stream beds.

GEI’s biologists, ecologists, and engineers provided environmental compliance support and developed ecological restoration designs for the affected 2.2 miles of Talmadge Creek along with various impacted areas along over 30 miles of the Kalamazoo River. Following initial planning, GEI staff led implementation of ecological restoration measures throughout the impacted area.

Services provided by GEI staff included wetland delineation, assessment of impacted natural areas, tree surveys, quantitative and qualitative vegetation surveys and monitoring, aquatic habitat assessments, aquatic vegetation field surveys, fish and wildlife habitat structure design and installation, river and stream geomorphological studies, hydraulic modeling for culvert replacements, invasive species control, riverbank soil stability and soil erosion assessments, federal/state/local environmental permitting, natural stream channel and stream bed reconstruction and stabilization, shoreline and wetland restoration design and construction, including the incorporation of bioengineering techniques, and technical report preparation.

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Key Challenges

After the release, the client elected to repair or replace the majority of Line 6B. GEI has completed multi-year ecological surveys and restoration associated with the pipeline repair and replacement effort across over 250 miles of pipeline corridor in the states of Indiana and Michigan.

After Line 6B repair and replacement work was completed, GEI restoration ecologists installed over 44,000 shrubs and trees within temporarily impacted forested and scrub-shrub wetlands throughout the pipeline corridor.

Federal and state permits for the project require temporarily impacted wetlands to be monitored for a period ranging from two to ten years. GEI botanists and restoration ecologists are conducting floristic inventories and quantitative plant sampling within over 300 wetlands each year to support this requirement.

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