Award or Recognition

GEI’s Cameron Davis Receives Two Honors for his work in the Great Lakes Region

July 12, 2017

On June 26, Cameron Davis was recognized for his work managing the Great Lakes Advisory Board (GLAB). When Congress funded the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative at some $300 million annually to reverse decades of ecosystem degradation, legislators asked the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to ensure transparency and input from a diversity of stakeholders. Working with several fellow federal agencies, Davis helped establish the GLAB, comprised of business, environmental, municipal, state and academic interests to ensure buy-in for GLRI investments. The award is a plaque with a cross section of a hollowed-out tamarack log that was used in Detroit in the early 1800s as a sanitary sewer pipe.

On the same day, Environment & Climate Change Canada presented Davis with recognition for his “past, present and future contributions” to Great Lakes health. Davis served as the U.S. co-chair of the Great Lakes Executive Committee under the U.S.-Canada Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement.

About Cameron Davis

Cameron Davis comes to GEI assisting clients with their government affairs needs, water tech startups, and other needs. He has more than 30 years’ experience in integrating policy, law, science, and economics. Prior to GEI, he coordinated the work of 11 federal departments, including the White House Council on Environmental Quality, and Departments of the Interior, Agriculture, Homeland Security, and Commerce, among others. His work includes federal policy and funding coordination valued at more than $2 billion under the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, which has been widely recognized as a successful results-oriented program with strong bipartisan support. In addition, Cam collaborated with state resource agencies, municipalities, tribes, academia, business, and civil stakeholders to clean up toxic hotspot Areas of Concern, prevent invasive species’ migration and reduce runoff to improve water quality.  He was also a lead negotiator on the U.S. negotiating team along with the U.S. Department of State that led to the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement of 2012, the first time in a quarter-century that the internationally-recognized pact had been revitalized. Cam earned his law degree, including certification in environmental and energy law, from the Illinois Institute of Technology’s Chicago-Kent College of Law and a B.A. from Boston University in International Relations.